In Live Oak News

Attractive clubhouses can be a large draw for potential renters when looking for a place to live. Studies show that Millennials are choosing to rent rather than buy when they move out of their parents’ homes. Many are living in multifamily units as singles and couples and are looking to entertain friends and family in their new apartments. Slightly under the largest demographic is the Baby Boomer generation which is more than 75 million people. They are now looking to downsize and rent more than ever for the convenient and luxurious amenities that apartments have to offer.

Improve your multifamily building’s clubhouse to give these demographics an added reason to want to live in your building and further, invite friends and family over to visit and enjoy the amenities. Below are a few ways you can update your clubhouse to create a real sense of community and drive new renters.

1. Incorporate Technology

Adding televisions to your clubhouse is a given. We’ve added small boutique movie theaters where the floors are framed at a slope to resemble a real theater. Something you might not have considered is having bluetooth pairing capabilities. Your tenants could walk into a room, hook up their mobile device and play their own music for social gatherings or hitting it hard in the fitness room. In a new project, we’re adding a golf simulator which are becoming increasingly popular in large cities. The simulator features high-definition graphics, and allows you to play against friends online and also provides an instruction mode to help hone your skills. Think of it as an investment for your apartment building that will give you that competitive edge.

2. Encourage Lingering

Add a small library or coffee bar into your clubhouse to get tenants comfortable with relaxing in the common space. Have floor-to-ceiling windows so natural light flows in and the pool or outdoors is viewable. If possible, having a play area for kids is a great way to encourage parents to work out or relax while their child plays. Wine or gastropub bars are perfect for entertaining guests visiting your community. Simply having a pool at your clubhouse will attract people, especially in the warmer months. Adding extras like a private cabana, outdoor kitchen, grills and firepits will attract even more tenants and have them stay for longer and entertain friends. Sun shelves or a zero entry water line are a great way to update your pool’s entire look. You can even put chairs on top of these shelves to encourage even more relaxation.

To attract health enthusiast offering a saltwater pool system can be a great alternative than chlorinated pools. By choosing a saltwater sanitizing system, you can reap the benefits of traditional chlorinated water without many of the negative side effects. People who are sensitive to chlorine often report fewer irritations when using these pools. While installing a salt water system will be more expensive, over time maintenance is cheaper and will pay its initial cost while being green as a benefit.

3. Create a Statement

One small update or addition can create a statement and add more value to your space. This can be a piece of artwork, sculpture or even a unique coffee table. Look for repurposed or recycled pieces, work from local artists or create your own piece to gather attention and become a conversation starter. Add plants or wall gardens to your clubhouse. Strategically placed plants and open glass windows and walls give residents the appearance of the outdoors even during cold winter months. Painting is the cheapest way to renew a space on a tight budget. You can freshen up a space with an accent wall, or paint woodwork with an accent color. You can also use paint techniques to create patterned walls or half-walls. There are a lot of changes you can make with just paint alone.

If your multifamily development needs a new clubhouse or a clubhouse renovation, contact Live Oak Contracting at (904) 497-1500. Two of our current projects, Arbors at Brighton Park & Saybrook Station, include new clubhouse construction.